How to enable TLS 1.2 on clients – Microsoft Learn

Applies to: Configuration Manager (Current Branch)

When enabling TLS 1.2 for your Configuration Manager environment, start by ensuring the clients are capable and properly configured to use TLS 1.2 before enabling TLS 1.2 and disabling the older protocols on the site servers and remote site systems. There are three tasks for enabling TLS 1.2 on clients:

  • Update Windows and WinHTTP
  • Ensure that TLS 1.2 is enabled as a protocol for SChannel at the operating system level
  • Update and configure the .NET Framework to support TLS 1.2

For more information about dependencies for specific Configuration Manager features and scenarios, see About enabling TLS 1.2.

Update Windows and WinHTTP

Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows 10, Windows Server 2016, and later versions of Windows natively support TLS 1.2 for client-server communications over WinHTTP.

Earlier versions of Windows, such as Windows 7 or Windows Server 2012, don’t enable TLS 1.1 or TLS 1.2 by default for secure communications using WinHTTP. For these earlier versions of Windows, install Update 3140245 to enable the registry value below, which can be set to add TLS 1.1 and TLS 1.2 to the default secure protocols list for WinHTTP. With the patch installed, create the following registry values:

Verify the value of the DefaultSecureProtocols registry setting, for example:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionInternet SettingsWinHttp DefaultSecureProtocols = (DWORD): 0xAA0 HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREWow6432NodeMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionInternet SettingsWinHttp DefaultSecureProtocols = (DWORD): 0xAA0

If you change this value, restart the computer.

The example above shows the value of 0xAA0 for the WinHTTP DefaultSecureProtocols setting. Update to enable TLS 1.1 and TLS 1.2 as default secure protocols in WinHTTP in Windows lists the hexadecimal value for each protocol. By default in Windows, this value is 0x0A0 to enable SSL 3.0 and TLS 1.0 for WinHTTP. The above example keeps these defaults, and also enables TLS 1.1 and TLS 1.2 for WinHTTP. This configuration ensures that the change doesn’t break any other application that might still rely on SSL 3.0 or TLS 1.0. You can use the value of 0xA00 to only enable TLS 1.1 and TLS 1.2. Configuration Manager supports the most secure protocol that Windows negotiates between both devices.

If you want to completely disable SSL 3.0 and TLS 1.0, use the SChannel disabled protocols setting in Windows. For more information, see Restrict the use of certain cryptographic algorithms and protocols in Schannel.dll.

Ensure that TLS 1.2 is enabled as a protocol for SChannel at the operating system level

For the most part, protocol usage is controlled at three levels, the operating system level, the framework or platform level, and the application level. TLS 1.2 is enabled by default at the operating system level. Once you ensure that the .NET registry values are set to enable TLS 1.2 and verify the environment is properly utilizing TLS 1.2 on the network, you may want to edit the SChannelProtocols registry key to disable the older, less secure protocols. For more information on disabling TLS 1.0 and 1.1, see Configuring Schannel protocols in the Windows Registry.

Update and configure the .NET Framework to support TLS 1.2

Determine .NET version

First, determine the installed .NET versions. For more information, see Determine which versions and service pack levels of .NET Framework are installed.

Install .NET updates

Install the .NET updates so you can enable strong cryptography. Some versions of .NET Framework might require updates to enable strong cryptography. Use these guidelines:

  • NET Framework 4.6.2 and later supports TLS 1.1 and TLS 1.2. Confirm the registry settings, but no additional changes are required.

  • Update NET Framework 4.6 and earlier versions to support TLS 1.1 and TLS 1.2. For more information, see .NET Framework versions and dependencies.

  • If you’re using .NET Framework 4.5.1 or 4.5.2 on Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2012 R2, or Windows Server 2012, it’s highly recommended that you install the latest security updates for the .Net Framework 4.5.1 and 4.5.2 to ensure TLS 1.2 can be enabled properly.

    For your reference, TLS 1.2 was first introduced into .Net Framework 4.5.1 and 4.5.2 with the following hotfix rollups:

    • For Windows 8.1 and Server 2012 R2: Hotfix rollup 3099842
    • For Windows Server 2012: Hotfix rollup 3099844

Configure for strong cryptography

Configure .NET Framework to support strong cryptography. Set the SchUseStrongCrypto registry setting to DWORD:00000001. This value disables the RC4 stream cipher and requires a restart. For more information about this setting, see Microsoft Security Advisory 296038.

Make sure to set the following registry keys on any computer that communicates across the network with a TLS 1.2-enabled system. For example, Configuration Manager clients, remote site system roles not installed on the site server, and the site server itself.

For 32-bit applications that are running on 32-bit OSs and for 64-bit applications that are running on 64-bit OSs, update the following subkey values:

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoft.NETFrameworkv2.0.50727] “SystemDefaultTlsVersions” = dword:00000001 “SchUseStrongCrypto” = dword:00000001 [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoft.NETFrameworkv4.0.30319] “SystemDefaultTlsVersions” = dword:00000001 “SchUseStrongCrypto” = dword:00000001

For 32-bit applications that are running on 64-bit OSs, update the following subkey values:

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREWow6432NodeMicrosoft.NETFrameworkv2.0.50727] “SystemDefaultTlsVersions” = dword:00000001 “SchUseStrongCrypto” = dword:00000001 [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREWOW6432NodeMicrosoft.NETFrameworkv4.0.30319] “SystemDefaultTlsVersions” = dword:00000001 “SchUseStrongCrypto” = dword:00000001

Next steps

  • Enable TLS 1.2 on the site servers and remote site systems
  • Common issues when enabling TLS 1.2